Stop!

A few days ago, this ad appeared on a website I was visiting:

unstopable

Since “unstoppable” is misspelled, my first reaction was to save the image so I could rant about it here.  But upon further research, I discovered that the misspelling wasn’t limited to the ad above.

unstopable

Of course, I had to get to the bottom of this–what true grammar snob could sleep at night without figuring out what went wrong?  According to an About.com product review, Downy claims that the product is so powerful it doesn’t need the second “p” in the word “unstoppable.”

Huh?

I hope this marketing ploy has worked for them, because they certainly aren’t getting my business.  Using this product would make me feel like a traitor.  What are your thoughts on misspelling as a form of marketing?

Flexibility

Rust-Oleum’s leak seal product might be flexible, but the dictionary is not!

flexable

Just in case the photo above didn’t elicit a good chuckle, here is a photo I took at work earlier this week:

mackelmore

Must be a new breed

I was doing some research at work on Saturday and I noticed this announcement on the Humane Society of Clark County website:

What a poser.

What a poser.

SMH.  (That’s “shaking my head,” right?  I can’t keep up with what the damn cool kids are saying these days.)  I feel pretty silly right now, because I’ve spent my whole life thinking that furry creature in the photo above is a dog.

Grammar gold

First things first:  Happy New Year!

Back in November, I saw this ad on Facebook and forgot all about it until I was sifting through my “Pictures” folder this morning.  (Note to self:  you have too much crap on your computer.)

facebookad

The obvious mistake is in the statement below the photo.  By sharing the photo, you’re not going to “get this rings.”  You might get “this ring” or “these rings,” but “this rings” is something a stupid person would give away.

I’m also curious about the claim that one winner will be drawn on 29th.  Yeah, there’s a period after “29th,” so I can only assume that’s the end of the sentence.  And is the winner drawn–as in, sketched–or is their name drawn from a hat or a raffle drum?

I wish you all a happy 2013 and hope you all stick to your resolutions for at least a week.