So you want to be an English Star?

I have been struggling to compile a list of super awesome online games to help children who are struggling with grammar.  During my research, I discovered a game called “So You Want to be an English Star?”  The first (logical) thing to do was to click on the button labeled “How to Play.”  And this is what I got:

englishstar

A true English Star would know that there are three levels.  The game developer is more like an English Nebula.

(Please excuse my nerdy cleverness.)

The game’s questions are also a bit…well, questionable.  Going into more detail would mean I’d rip the game to shreds and use excessive amounts of profanity, so if I’ve piqued your curiosity, feel free to see for yourself how awful this game is.

I’m also sad to report that my search for grammar games wasn’t very successful.  Apparently there isn’t much demand for associating grammar with fun.  Meanwhile, somewhere in America, a teenage girl is giggling over her use of the word “redonk.”  Welcome to the deterioration of society!

Thankfully, my hunt was not 100% disastrous.  I did find a game called “Trapped” that combines punctuation practice, a variety of games, and a nice little animated story.  My future children will thank me later.

Pojo’s needs some mojo

Today I attended an 8-year-old’s birthday party at a local arcade named Pojo’s.  Though I spent (ahem…wasted) about ten dollars trying–and failing–to win the stupid Pile Up game, taking these photographs didn’t cost me a penny:

Offordable.  Offordable?!  Of course, the sign is supposed to be advertising “affordable” fun, but what I’m seeing is a word pronounced “offered-able.”  But hold on–it gets better!  Once inside, I snatched up some of the pamphlets and flyers on display that advertise special events and birthday party packages.  One pamphlet describes Pojo’s as “tobbaco free” (correct spelling:  tobacco), while the other exhibits numerous examples of apostrophe abuse.  In fact, despite the presence of the apostrophe in the Pojo’s sign (see picture), neither the pamphlets nor the arcade’s website include an apostrophe in the name.  So, what’ll it be, Pojo’s?  Apostrophe or no apostrophe?  Make up your mind, already!

Honestly, I was going somewhere with this rant.  I think the employees at Pojo’s could really stand to benefit from the quarters I wasted on Pile Up–they should consider spending them on a dictionary!